Posts tagged Zach Gage

hyperallergic:

Zach Gage, “Best Day Ever” (2009, 2010)  Zach Gage’s Data projects involve a consideration of how personal traits or experiences are stored and mediated via the Internet, especially social networking sites and programs. Memory and interpersonal connections, however simulated, are recurring themes throughout his work, exploring the boundaries between “data” and “experience.” “Best Day Ever” is a computer program that searches through all public tweets at 6:30pm EST each day for the phrase “best day ever,” retweeting one per day at random. The feed is also presented as an LED installation. Gage describes the @MyBestDayEver twitter feed as “like having a friend who is always having the greatest day of their life. Best Day Ever challenges the data-aggregate model by finding personal and humanistic meaning in the masses of data posted to twitter every second, and delivering this meaning in a way that is relatable and not overwhelming.” Projects like this make me wonder if the interesting point is technology’s potential for emotional intelligence, or the possibly infinite capacity (necessity?) of humans to anthropromorphize.

hyperallergic:

Zach Gage, “Best Day Ever” (2009, 2010)

Zach Gage’s Data projects involve a consideration of how personal traits or experiences are stored and mediated via the Internet, especially social networking sites and programs. Memory and interpersonal connections, however simulated, are recurring themes throughout his work, exploring the boundaries between “data” and “experience.” “Best Day Ever” is a computer program that searches through all public tweets at 6:30pm EST each day for the phrase “best day ever,” retweeting one per day at random. The feed is also presented as an LED installation. Gage describes the @MyBestDayEver twitter feed as “like having a friend who is always having the greatest day of their life. Best Day Ever challenges the data-aggregate model by finding personal and humanistic meaning in the masses of data posted to twitter every second, and delivering this meaning in a way that is relatable and not overwhelming.” Projects like this make me wonder if the interesting point is technology’s potential for emotional intelligence, or the possibly infinite capacity (necessity?) of humans to anthropromorphize.

"hit counter" by Zach Gage

"hit counter" by Zach Gage